Fifty Shades of Grey(hounds)

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CINCINNATI–Well, not really, not 50 outfits.   But these gorgeous Greyhound sisters are reputed to have numerous fashionable outfits to combat the chill on their walks with owners Jack and Mary-Bob Rubenstein. The Amberley Village couple, pictured in their matching Cincinnati Bengals caps, rescued Lucy and Annie, 8, from a racetrack in Birmingham, Ala., six years ago through Queen City Greyhounds.  When not walking his dogs, Mr. Rubenstein has been designated as a “Super Lawyer®” and is considered one of the top-rated criminal defense attorneys in Ohio.
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Bob Dylan, zoning & a miniature horse

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By Barbara L. Morgenstern, Esq.
Publisher, Queen City Pets®

Your home is your castle, the saying goes.

And for most of us, it is our largest financial investment.

With so much at stake, the zoning ordinance of Blue Ash, Ohio, prohibiting farm animals at residences is common, municipal law.

Barnyard animals and their smells easily could threaten property values in a suburb such as Blue Ash.

But change forces new paradigms. This change involved testing the boundaries of reasonable accommodations for the disabled, despite Blue Ash’s zoning restrictions.

The change reflected medical recognition of “Hippotherapy”—therapy through the use of horses. Complicated, evolving federal law came in to play.

In the federal court battle that just settled in Blue Ash (see “Miniature Therapy Horse Rocks Zoning Law…“), one of the top doctors at the world-renown Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center recommended Hippotherapy for a severely disabled child, by means of a miniature therapy horse named Ellie, just 28 inches tall.

The settlement allows Ellie to remain in the girl’s backyard, with strict rules. Waste removal figures prominently. The consent degree allow U.S. District Judge Timothy S. Black to remove Ellie for violations. Time will tell.

Artists, not so much miniature horses, often challenge the status quo.

This year, musician Bob Dylan won the Nobel Peace Prize for Literature in recognition of his poetic lyrics from the tumultuous 1960s.

A miniature horse and poetry, both nudging change.

As Dylan sang in The Times They Are A-Changin’:

“Come gather ‘round people wherever you roam

And admit that the waters around you have grown….”
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DAAP DOGGIE DIGS DESIGN

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Three-legged charmer attends university
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daap_2Madeleine Bransford, left, a student at UC’s prestigious College of Design, Architecture, Art and Planning (DAAP), with her professor Margaret Voelker-Ferrier and dog Pun’Kin ponder the intricacies of pattern making. Toting her pint-sized pet to class in her purse, Madeleine’s dog became the darling of the program.

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By Barbara L. Morgenstern, publisher

UNIVERSITY OF CINCINNATI — The irony of her rescued dog’s life sometimes saddens Madeleine Bransford, a recent graduate here.

For it was the ordeal of his leg amputation that won him his freedom from a miserable life in a puppy mill.

“He has such a good life now,” said Ms. Bransford, 23, whose four-pound, six-year-old pet became the darling of the Fashion Design Program at UC’s prestigious College of Design, Architecture, Art and Planning (DAAP) here.

She said Pun’Kin , so named because he was adopted on Halloween. likely was used as a breeding dog until his leg became infected by an imbedded blanket string and his neglectful owner brought him to a veterinary. Ms. Bransford said the veterinarian also suspected that the dog’s bark had been silenced by a pipe jammed down his throat.

Pun’Kin was weak and there was doubt whether he would survive, so the breeders did not want to pay for the amputation and decided to put him down. “Someone that worked at the vets luckily took him in, “she said, eventually leading to his recovery and adoption.

Toting her pint-sized pet to class in her purse, Pun’Kin hung out with adoring DAAP students in fashion design classrooms filled with yards of chiffon, tailoring woolens, hand and machine-made knits, and skeins of cashmere and Alpaca.

“Everyone wants to see him,” she said. “It’s kind of like therapeutic.”

Although Pun’Kin’s tininess is part of his charm, she warns against becoming mesmerized by size when selecting a dog. “Basically, because he’s so small, everyone loves him,” she explained. Pun’Kin is short of 12 inches long, she said.

However, there are down sides. “Being bred so small has health issues, but puppy mills don’t care,” she said.

Ms. Bransford is among the university’s elite DAAP students whose course work includes mandatory cooperative education components where students work full time in the fashion industry on alternating semesters. She found her talent in accessories and surface design and has worked in coop jobs in Kenai, Alaska; Los Angeles; Columbus; and New York City.

Despite the glamour and pull of her career, Ms. Bransford’s aspirations also are influenced by the little dog who captured her heart. “I want to be happy and take care of me and my dog.”
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Fashion Design Associate Professor Injoo Kim snuggling with Pun’Kin.

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DAAP Fashion Design Professor Emerita Margaret Voelker-Ferrier bonding with Pun’Kin.

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Free fixing available for all Hamilton county cats

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Photos provided by OAR

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By Barbara L. Morgenstern, Esq.
Publisher

HAMILTON COUNTY, Ohio — No matter if a cat is your pet, a stray, hangs out in a barn or is among those free spirits we call “feral,” the feline population here can get important medical services at no cost in 2016.

For a cat to be spayed or neutered and to receive the rabies vaccine, all free, sponsors advise:little-girl-with-kitten

    • Whoever brings in a cat must have a valid Hamilton County address.
    • Book an appointment by calling 513-871-0185.

The year-long, Hamilton County, Ohio, program is an effort to decrease cat euthanasia at the county’s animal shelter because of overpopulation.

The surgery and vaccine can be provided at two clinics, the Ohio Alleycat Resource (OAR) in Madisonville or the United Coalition for Animals (UCAN) in Camp Washington.

The Joanie Bernard Foundation, a trust that funds groups that work to help save cats in the Greater Cincinnati area, is funding the one-year program, in a joint venture with the SPCA Cincinnati and OAR.

The program is an effort “to decrease the intake and euthanasia rate at the SPCA,” according to OAR.

“OAR and the SPCA have been working, since 2013, to increase the number of cats finding ‘live outcomes’ (adoption, release) at the the SPCA.

This has included a project to fix and release feral cats brought to the SPCA, and to have more “no-ill” rescues pull cats from the SPCA for their own group to adopt out.

We hope, with this effort, to remove any hurdles families might face to fixing their cats, in an effort to control the cat population and end shelter euthanasia of healthy cats in our country.”
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