DEBAUCHERY AT DOG PARK

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Amberley Village, Ohio—Our dogs had a four-way smell at a park here recently where they usually exhibit fine manners. Photo by Queen City Pets® www.queencitypets.com.
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Yankee Ingenuity Enables Dog To Enjoy Family Walks

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Mark Higgins and his wife Emmy on their daily walk with Annie in her adapted stroller. Annie’s brother BoBear, from the same litter, stays close by. Mark Higgins and his wife Emmy on their daily walk with Annie in her adapted stroller. Annie’s brother BoBear, from the same litter, stays close by.
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By Barbara L. Morgenstern, Publisherfullsizeoutput_118a
Queen City Pets®

CINCINNATI– Annie, an 8-year-old Golden Retriever, lost her right front leg to bone cancer last February.

The brave girl couldn’t wait to get back to her daily romps in the park with her brother BoBear and her owners Emmy O’Mahoney-Higgins and her husband Mark Higgins of Cincinnati.

And back she is.

“She’s able to hop about a mile on a very good day,” said Ms. O’Mahoney-Higgins. “Usually she does a bit of running around and then gets into her ride.“

Annie’s “ride” is a child’s jogging stroller that Mr. Higgins adapted for their dog, so she could continue to enjoy her walks with the family who loves her so much.
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Cincy dog survived Hurricane Katrina

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Rescuers Save Hundreds of Animals Following Louisiana Floods
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Cincinnatian Ken Paley and his dog Marley, a survivor of the 2005 Hurricane Katrina in Louisiana.
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By Barbara L. Morgenstern, Esq.
Publisher, Queen City Pets®
www.queencitypets.com

As flooding again bombards Louisiana in biblical proportions, Marley the Labrador Retriever enjoys the love and safety of her adoptive family here in Cincinnati.

Photo provided by OAR

A nightmare revisited from Hurricane Katrina, animals are rescued once again in massive Louisiana flooding. Click for full story.

She escaped death in 2005 when Hurricane Katrina hit Louisiana.

Marley went from “doggy hell to doggy heaven,” said her owner Ken Paley of Cincinnati.

Now, more than a decade later, animals in Louisiana again are depending upon the kindness of strangers for their survival.

On August 12, Denham Springs Animal Shelter in New Orleans made a bold move to save its animals, according to the Huffington Post.

The shelter was engulfed in rising floodwaters. Staff and volunteers fought to save as many animals as possible but eventually unlatched the kennel’s doors so that the dogs could swim out and climb onto the facility’s roof to safety, according to the shelter’s GoFundMe page.

The Louisiana Veterinary Medical Association has asked for donations to go to LSART, the state’s animal disaster response and rescue organization. Contributions can be made through the association’s website.

Marley survived Hurricane Katrina’s epic destruction, then battled for her health once rescued. Twice she endured brutal heart worm therapy–“shots in the back and six weeks in a cage,”Mr. Paley said.

Life is a charm now for Marley, estimated to be 12-13 years old. Mr. Paley, 65, vice president of Marketing for Episcopal Retirement Services, takes Marley to work every day and the 52-pound female also visits a nursing home as a service dog.

“She was in very rough shape, afraid of everything,” Mr. Paley remembered. “She would cower if you raised your hand or your voice.” The dog was so traumatized, she would not bark for a full year, he said.

Marley’s journey from Louisiana to Cincinnati was circuitous.

The queen will see you nowBrimming with health now, Marley is an estimated age 13.

It began when Mr. Paley volunteered with 16 others from his church, Horizon Community Church in Newtown, to clear debris from home sites at a community outside of New Orleans, making room for FEMA trailers.

Shocked by the destruction, with chain saws, a Bobcat compact excavator and other equipment, the volunteers cleared things like cars from people’s living rooms and a boat from a porch. The victims were so grateful, sometimes they cried, he remembered.

When Mr. Paley returned to Cincinnati, there was more crying—his wife Pam was moved to tears when she saw a TV news story reporting that two planeloads of dogs and cats had been rescued from the Katrina disaster and had been airlifted to Cincinnati.

Lining up at the SPCA in Sharonville after background checks, potential adopters or foster care volunteers could only say “yes” or “no” when offered a dog, he explained. There was no shopping. Marley became family at that moment.

The Paley’s children, Jeff and Lauren, now in their 20s, named their new pet from Louisiana after the reggae singer Bob Marley, he said.

Marley ready to greet office guests
Gentle Marley gives back by serving as a service dog at a nursing home.

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Obese rescue dog on his way to svelteness

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Obese rescue dog on his way to svelteness
Move over, Oprah!

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Adding green beans to his food, as per his vet’s recommendation, has helped Ryder lose weight.

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By Barbara L. Morgenstern
Publisher

MADERIA, Ohio—With the help of a green bean diet, exercise and “lots of love,” in just one month, Ryder the seriously overweight English Labrador has lost 10 of the 50 pounds he must shed.

And he has his own Instagram account where admirers can follow his progress: @ryderbear.

His rescuers, Ashley and Scott, adopted the three-year-old, 130-pound dog from the Cincinnati Lab Rescue in late January. Every two weeks, Ryder gets weighed, Ashley said.

Excess weight can reduce pet life expectancy and negatively impact quality of life, according to the Association for Pet Obesity Prevention (APOP).

“Numerous studies have linked obesity with type 2 diabetes, osteoarthritis, high blood pressure, many forms of cancer and decreased life expectancy,” according to the APOP.

Ashley said Ryder’s new vet, Dr. Julie Storm of Madeira Veterinary Hospital, has been “fantastic” in helping Ryder achieve his weight loss by adding low calorie green beans to his diet.

Scott said their new dog also has thrived with regular exercise and playing with other dogs and through “lots of love.”

Ryder seriously is charming other dog walkers at Rheinstrom Park, Indian Hill, with his big smile, playfulness and sweet demeanor.

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Ryder in all his glory.

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Ashley, left, and Scott with slimmed-down Ryder at a park.

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Canine Cuisine features pumpkin treats

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Oh, the antioxidants!

In her continuing column, Certified Chef Diana Klein creates “Fido Fare” and “Family Fare” from many of the same ingredients, this time using canned pumpkin.

Chef Diana aims to save time and provide readers with healthful recipes for our dogs as well as for our families.

It is our experience that if you take a pocketful of these dog treats on your walks, you will make lots of canine friends.  And if you get super hungry, go ahead and share one with your dog (this has happened!)  All the ingredients are healthful.
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Chef Diana at home with her dog Phoenix.
Chef Diana at home with her dog Phoenix.

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Family Fare
Pumpkin Cookies

2 cups whole wheat flour

1 tsp baking soda

1 tsp baking powder

1 tsp. cinnamon

1/2 tsp. ground nutmeg

1/2 tsp. salt

1 1/2 cups granulated sugar

1/2 cup butter, softened

1 can, 14.5 oz., organic pumpkin

1 large egg

1 teaspoon vanilla extract

Preheat oven to 350° F. Grease baking sheets.

Combine flour, baking soda, baking powder, cinnamon, nutmeg and salt in medium bowl.

Beat sugar and butter in large mixer bowl until well blended. Beat in pumpkin, egg and vanilla extract until smooth.

Gradually beat wet ingredients into flour mixture. Drop by rounded tablespoon onto prepared baking sheets.

Bake for 15 to 18 minutes or until edges are firm. Cool on baking sheets for 2 minutes; remove to wire racks to cool completely. Drizzle glaze over cookies.

For glaze:

Combine 2 cups sifted powdered sugar, 3 tablespoons milk, 1 tablespoon melted butter and 1 teaspoon vanilla extract in a small bowl.  Blend  until smooth.
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Fido Fare
Pumpkin dog treats

1 can, 14.5 oz., organic pumpkin or puree

2 cups whole wheat flour

1 cup sugar free applesauce

1/4 cup nutritional yeast*

1 cup peanut butter

Mix all ingredients well in a mixing bowl. Add more flour as needed to make sure batter is not sticky (this is key.)

Separate the dough into thirds and roll out one onto floured surface.

Cut the dough using a round biscuit cutter or a knife, if you want to make squares.

Place on cookie sheets lined with parchment paper, bake in a 225-degree oven for at least 40 minutes.  The longer you bake, the harder the treats become.

Note:  if the treats are allowed to bake longer and become hard, they store better in a plastic bag or in containers.

*Nutritional yeast is a natural flea repellent when ingested, but should not replace your flea/tick medication.
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“Breathe deeply,” pet a cat

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A delightful “Cats & Mats” yoga class took place recently at the Sharonville SPCA with cats joining participants for deep stretches. For a donation of $10, participants enjoyed yoga, light refreshments and “fantastic SPCA Cincinnati felines to interact with after the yoga class comes to an end,” according to organizers. “Cats are great yogis and they love to practice their moves alongside others.” Pictured on stage, from left, are Jane Minges of West Chester; yoga instructor Marta Streit of Florence, Ky.; and Jake Fisher and Taylor Bolser, both of Hamilton.
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Vet does heavy lifting for needy pets

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UPF3United Pet Fund’s Dr. Zekoff, on truck, with a helper, moving donations. UPF secures and organizes donations to distribute to the 150-plus “mom and pop” Tri-State groups that serve animals in need.
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BLUE ASH, Ohio–At his veterinarian school, it is unlikely that “fork lift operation” was listed as an elective.

Dr. Zeke Zekoff could have used it.

As founder and president of United Pet Fund (UPF), the veterinarian often transitions from performing surgery, to moving semi truckloads of donations by forklift at the non-profit’s Costco-like warehouse here.

“United Pet Fund (UPF) supports an army, the lesser-known army of people who help animals in need,” explained Zekoff, a full-time veterinarian who started UPF 10 years ago.

UPF secures and organizes donations to distribute to the 150-plus “mom and pop” Tri-State groups that serve animals in need.

Dr. Zekoff explained animal rescue groups often suffer from “compassion fatigue,” overwhelmed by needs.

UPF’s volunteers support these groups by providing donated products, so volunteers can focus on caring for animals, he explained.

For needy animals, he described UPF as “a combo” of Matthew 25: Ministries, the international humanitarian and disaster relief organization headquartered in Cincinnati; United Way and the USO, which provides support for military members and their families.
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A sampling of donations received from corporations, manufacturers and individuals includes five semi truckloads of Bounty Towels from Procter & Gamble.

A national pet food organization, Rescue Bank, has delivered semi-truckloads of pet food from Iams and Alpo, and Blue Buffalo often contributes large food donations.

Also, as part of UPF’s community-sharing philosophy, Matthew 25: Ministries donated 1200 domed litter boxes from Kao that can be transformed into feral cat shelters or housing for smaller animals, such as ferrets.

Aside from supplies, UPF supports continuing education for volunteers and rescue group personnel. UPF also provides handyman services; pet health day events in under-served areas, such as Over-the-Rhine; and emergency funds.

Further information is at www.unitedpetfund.org.
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PROFILE:

Dr. Zeke Zekoff, 58, known as “Dr. Z.”

Title: Founder & President, United Pet Fund (UPF), Blue Ash.

He also has owned and operated Towne Square Animal Clinic, Blue Ash, for 30 years.

Education: DVM from Auburn University School of Veterinary Medicine in Alabama. He also earned his BS in Animal & Dairy Sciences there.

Routine: Up at 3:45 a.m., Dr. Zekoff arrives at his clinic at 5 a.m. to do two hours of UPF paperwork. He then performs spays/neuters from 7-9 a.m., sees patients all day, and leaves the clinic at 5:30 p.m. for the UPF offices and warehouse. There he meets with groups and distributes supplies, among other things.

Family: Wife Barbara and Dr. Zekoff hail from the South. More than 30 years ago they considered Cincinnati to be a temporary stop after vet school. The couple have three children. Alex, 29, is working on his MBA from University of California at Berkeley and looks to return to Deloitte as a consultant; Austin, 26, graduated from Miami University and works at Ernst & Young in New York City as an advisory assistant; and Ashley, 22, graduated from the University of Cincinnati with a degree in marketing and operates her own fitness training business.

Pet: The “pawed” love of his life,” a 5-year-old Cavapoo dog named Hunter, often is with him daily.

Hobbies: Weather permitting, he plays golf on Thursdays, “my day off.” Often on those Thursdays and weekends he travels with volunteers to pick up donations from as far away as Wisconsin.

Bottom line: “Pets are my ministry.”
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My Furry Valentine

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Pet adoption event breaks attendance records, finds homes for hundreds of animals

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Paige Moore, left, and Wesley Larson of Batavia, Ohio, adopted Vadar from Ohio Alleycat Resource (OAR).
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CINCINNATI  – A record-breaking 13,500 people attended the 2016 My Furry Valentine pet adoption event here recently. About 630 pets found homes over two days, according organizers.

And there’s more good news. Hundreds of adoption applications still are pending and pet lovers adopted more than 50 animals before the event began, because of pre-event promotions, according to spokesperson Elysa Hamlin.

In its fifth year, the event held this year at the Sharonville Convention Center represents the Tri-State’s largest annual animal adoption event.

Despite snowy weather conditions, the event saw a 35% increase in attendance.

The event has found homes for more than 2,600 pets over the past five years.  My Furry Valentine brings together animal rescues and shelters from throughout the region to showcase adoptable pets to potential owners at one location on the Valentine’s Day weekend.
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Isaac, left, and Wes of Harrison adopted Jamaica from Homeless Animal Rescue (HART).
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The event also aims to encourage community members who are looking for a pet any time throughout the year to think adoption first.

“Many people would be surprised to learn just how many great family pets they see in their neighborhoods that are actually rescue animals, including purebreds,” said Carolyn Evans, founder of My Furry Valentine.

“Our goal is to dispel common myths about shelter animals and educate people about the many resources where they can adopt,” Ms. Evans explained.

“Saving an animal by choosing adoption is easy,” she said. “There are so many great local animal shelters and rescue groups that are open and hosting adoption events every weekend. There are always thousands of wonderful animals looking for a great homes.
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Mariemont High School students Emma Worple, left, Riley Hayes and Amanda Lewis volunteered at the event.

My Furry Valentine Adoption Photo 2016
Mya, left, and McKenna Roeske of Wyoming, Ohio, adopted their puppy, Jenny, from Stray Animal Adoption Program (SAAP).

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Shellie Webb of Chesapeake, Ohio, adopted Dory from Louie’s Legacy.

“Vadar” photo caption left to right: Paige Moore and Wesley Larson, residents of Batavia, OH adopted their new kitten, Vadar, from OAR at the fifth annual My Furry Valentine adoption event.
Audrey, left, and Sloane Green of Dayton adopted Cosmo from Barely Used Pets.
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All Photos provided by My Furry Valentine.
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CINCY RANKS #1 PET-LOVING CITY IN THE U.S.

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Virginia might be for lovers.

But for pet lovers, Cincinnati is ranked #1 in the United States.

For the second year in a row, thank you very much.

Out of 100 of the nation’s largest cities.

So go give your pets some sugar, Cincinnatians.

The 2015 ranking is based “across 16 key metrics” by Wallet Hub, a financial website which describes itself as a “one-stop destination” to help consumers and small business owners make better money decisions.  In 2014, Cincinnati also came in first.

In WalletHub’s “2015’s Best & Worst Cities for Pet Lovers,”  Wallet Hub,  the website explained: “With current and aspiring pet parents in mind, Wallet Hub compared the creature-friendliness of the 100 largest U.S. cities across 16 key metrics.

About 79.7 million Americans own a pet, whose care costs between $235 to nearly $2,000 annually, according to the report.

“Our data set ranges from the minimum pet-care provider rate per visit to the number of pet businesses per capita,” according to the article.
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My Furry Valentine, Cincinnati’s largest pet adoption event, is just one of the many volunteer activities that support animal welfare. At the event it was love at first sight for John Thomas of Batavia, left, who adopted 96-pound Samantha, 5, an American Bulldog. At right, Amanda Cantrell, director of the Humane Society of Adams County, had fostered Samantha for two months. The event featured rescue exhibits from various breeds, such as the pictured Buckeye Bulldog Rescue.
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Cincinnati ranked #2 in the most-veterinarians-per-capita category.

Other metrics include average home square footage; number of animal shelters; pet-friendly trails; outdoor environment and amusement; and the number of pet businesses and caretakers.

WalletHub, launched in 2012, offers other lists, such as The Best and Worst Cities for Families; the Safest States to Live In; the Best and Worst Cities to Retire; and the Most and Least Educated Cities.”

In the top 10 of the best pet-loving cities for 2015, behind the illustrious Queen City, came St. Louis; Colorado Springs, Colo.; Tampa, Fla.; Richmond, Va.; Tulsa, Okla.; Las Vegas; Reno, Nev.; Boise City, Idaho; and Madison, Wis.

Ranking 91-98 as the worst cities for pet lovers are Philadelphia; Jacksonville, Fla.; Boston; Chicago; Jersey City, N.J.; Memphis, Tenn.; Detroit; and Santa Ana, Calif.
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From prison to pedagogy, puppy becomes Miami U. “student”

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pedagogy
Winks learned to stay close to his puppy raiser, student Lauren DuVall, whose sister, Taylor DuVall, left, serves as a puppy sitter.

OXFORD, Ohio –Even with no dog treats in sight, Winks behaved beautifully while attending English class here at Miami University.

The seven-month-old, Golden-Labrador Retriever lay patiently at the foot of her puppy raiser, Lauren DuVall, of Eaton, Ohio, a middle childhood education major involved in the “4 Paws University” program.

Professor Mark Bernheim
Professor Mark Bernheim

“I love having her reclining in the class for 80 minutes looking up at me from the corner of her eyes,” said Professor Mark Bernheim, who welcomed Winks into his Children’s Literature class.  Bernheim recently retired after 45 years.

Thanks to a Xenia, Ohio-based organization, 4pawsforability.org., trained dogs, such as Winks, are placed worldwide with children suffering disabilities that include seizures, diabetes and autism.  The program also serves certain veterans.

For example, to assist children with seizures, dogs are trained to notice the seizures before the outward signs are available, according to the website. Diabetic-alert dogs are trained to smell the chemical body changes that occur as insulin levels increase or drop.

A prison was Winks’ first training ground in the segment of the training program called “Mission Pawsible.” There specially qualified inmates at Ohio prisons in Warren, Lebanon, Pickaway and London give the puppies their first months of foundation training, according to the website.

After that, Winks arrived for her semester at tree-lined Miami, described by the poet Robert Frost as “the most beautiful campus that ever there was.”

Winks was DuVall’s constant companion, attending class, activities, meetings, shopping and events while DuVall integrated the training she received to help mold the puppy. DuVall’s roommate was co-puppy raiser.

DuVall, 22, who has graduated and plans to student teach in the fall, served as vice president of Miami’s 4 Paws University chapter and puppy raised two more dogs after Winks.

“I have high hopes of teaching sixth grade,” said DuVall.  “4 Paws was the other half of me in college, next to teaching.  It gave me an additional passion and allowed me to make the most of my college experience.  I wouldn’t change it for the world.  Separating from Winks and the other three dogs I helped raise was never easy.  It was heartbreaking.  But I know that no matter where I go, I will always carry a little piece of each one of them with me.”

Other universities participating in “4 Paws University” include Wittenberg; Kentucky; Wright State; Ohio State; Cedarville; the College of Wooster; Ohio Northern; and Manchester.
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